affairemortal:

Visage de Mystère (Mystery Face) by Rafael Ohana
(Original Version)

affairemortal:

Visage de Mystère (Mystery Face) by Rafael Ohana

(Original Version)

nuncalosabre:


In Pictures. A Hollywood Satire - Will Connell
red-lipstick:

Zaidoigres aka Sergio Diaz (Argentina) - Martyr, 2010     Digital Arts: Paintings

red-lipstick:

Zaidoigres aka Sergio Diaz (Argentina) - Martyr, 2010     Digital Arts: Paintings

I’ve been a massage therapist for many years, now. I know what people look like. People have been undressing for me for a long time. I know what you look like: a glance at you, and I can picture pretty well what you’d look like on my table.

Let’s start here with what nobody looks like: nobody looks like the people in magazines or movies. Not even models. Nobody. Lean people have a kind of rawboned, unfinished look about them that is very appealing. But they don’t have plump round breasts and plump round asses. You have plump round breasts and a plump round ass, you have a plump round belly and plump round thighs as well. That’s how it works. And that’s very appealing too.

Woman have cellulite. All of them. It’s dimply and cute. It’s not a defect. It’s not a health problem. It’s the natural consequence of not consisting of photoshopped pixels, and not having emerged from an airbrush.

Men have silly buttocks. Well, if most of your clients are women, anyway. You come to male buttocks and you say — what, this is it? They’re kind of scrawny and the tissue is jumpy because it’s unpadded; you have to dial back the pressure, or they’ll yelp.

Adults sag. It doesn’t matter how fit they are. Every decade, an adult sags a little more. All of the tissue hangs a little looser. They wrinkle, too. I don’t know who put about the rumor that just old people wrinkle. You start wrinkling when you start sagging, as soon as you’re all grown up, and the process goes its merry way as long as you live. Which is hopefully a long, long time, right?

Everybody on a massage table is beautiful. There are really no exceptions to this rule. At that first long sigh, at that first thought that “I can stop hanging on now, I’m safe” – a luminosity, a glow, begins. Within a few minutes the whole body is radiant with it. It suffuses the room: it suffuses the massage therapist too. People talk about massage therapists being caretakers, and I suppose we are: we like to look after people, and we’re easily moved to tenderness. But to let you in on a secret: I’m in it for the glow.

I’ll tell you what people look like, really: they look like flames. Or like the stars, on a clear night in the wilderness.

What People Really Look Like (via jumbleofnotes)

(If you’ve never had a massage, get one. Full-body, Deep-tissue massage, include scalp massage. Best choice of my life.)

arthistorianmindswirls:

Arnold Böcklin, The Lamentations of Mary Magdalene on the body of Christ

arthistorianmindswirls:

Arnold Böcklin, The Lamentations of Mary Magdalene on the body of Christ

bazaari:

by William Morris

bazaari:

by William Morris

10,343 playsDownload

sexmusic:

one more cup of coffee (valley below) // the white stripes

download: amazon mp3 | itunes

thedoppelganger:

Magazine: Vogue US March 1953Photographer: John Rawlings 

thedoppelganger:

Magazine: Vogue US March 1953
Photographer: John Rawlings 

mariamagnolia6:

Aaron Westerberg, Repose in red

mariamagnolia6:

Aaron Westerberg, Repose in red

rikaorlanda:

EME
(title and wall for her first upcoming solo show in  Gallery Montana, Barcelona, SP 24-10)

rikaorlanda:

EME

(title and wall for her first upcoming solo show in  Gallery Montana, Barcelona, SP 24-10)

archiemcphee:

Let’s pay a visit to the Department of Awesome Antiquities and take a look at a 17th century pocket watch, courtesy of Columbia University. This astonishing device is a sort of sundial called a diptych dial, used for telling time by the light of the sun or the moon. They were produced by exceptionally skilled craftmen, most often in Nuremberg, Germany, from the 1500s through the 1700s.

"When opened, the string gnomon—the raised device that creates a shadow—is drawn tight. On some more sophisticated models, the string can be adjusted to account for different latitudes. Typically the top section would be used to determine the time using sunlight and the bottom section would be used to learn the time with moonlight."

This exquisitely beautiful Diptych Dial was created by Hans Trvschel in Nuremberg in 1603. It’s made of ivory, with a string gnomon horizontal dial and pin gnomon for the vertical dial.

[via Neatorama]